Gaming

Life Lessons Learned from Freeplay: A Video Game Guide to Maximum Euphoric Bliss

Y'all know I'm a bookworm by now. I was excited to add Freeplay to my Goodreads list, but I wasn't expecting to get a life lesson out of it. Seriously, every page I just sat on my couch like "Well, shit...time to make a change."

Freeplay: A Video Game Guide to Maximum Euphoric Bliss was finished in less than a day. A quick read that I assumed would go into more scientific evidence about how video games actually make you happy, ended up being one of those long car rides with your dad while he gives you a lecture about life using gaming as a metaphor.

And honestly, that is just what I needed.

Jordan Shapiro, the author, is a dad himself, so that could explain it. Shapiro actually got into gaming as an adult while playing with his children and it brought them closer together.

And much like the good father he is, his book taught me so much about life that I really need to A) quite strongly recommend you read it for yourself but also B) share some of his wisdom here.

Here are some of my favorite quotes from the book and how they will stick with me:

 

As a perfectionist, I needed to learn that losing wasn't the end of the world. Just like in gaming, you learn more about how to beat your bosses from losing than you do from winning.

How many times in life did I need to restart, try another level, even repeat the same level again? I felt like a failure and that I was giving up. But the thing is, I wasn't taking the whole cartridge out, I was pressing the restart button.

And how many times have I been too afraid to take a risk? To jump into a new relationship when I wasn't sure if I would get hurt again? To quit a toxic job because I didn't have a new one lined up just yet (and before you say anything, I found a new job two days later. This quote is the truth).

I was surprised that this book even spoke to the social justice. With all that's going on in the world lately, it's good to be validated that I'm fighting the good fight.

 

And finally, I'll leave you with this quote. it reiterates on losing, but man is it powerful

 

 

 

KantCon Proves That Gaming is for Everybody

KantCon is a tabletop convention located in Overland Park, KS. Every year, gaming enthusiasts get together to do what they love most: game.

From my Instagram Takeover on Saturday, you could tell there were plenty of geeky vendors in the gaming halls. There was no shortage of dice holders, merch with gaming references, and D20 dice. In fact, one of those dice was a big old stuffed version that I plan to buy for me- I mean, Bby-8.

But attending a gaming convention can make you question yourself. Am I enough of a gamer to be here? What kind of knowledge do I need to have to go in?

The answer: None. Seriously, come as you are. What are your other excuses?

"I have kids and don't have a babysitter"

Bring them with you. Seriously. KantCon is a very family oriented convention. There is even a Kids KantCon gaming area, where there are board games, soft lightsabers, and even a Make Your Own Mask station. I saw older children playing in the main hall with the best of them.

"Seriously, I don't know much about games"

The thing I loved about KantCon is that you could have walked in their accidentally, said "cool, I'd like to attend, but I've never played a tabletop game before" and someone would be willing to show you how to play.

There was no gatekeeping here. Everyone here was so polite and willing to teach anyone about the world of tabletop gaming.

There was a very nice gentleman that told me everything I needed to know about Artemis. There was a small area set up with about 4 laptops and a projection screen. While also helping those in the middle of their gameplay, he even came up to me and explained how the game worked. The best being is that it would work on almost any computer system. No gaming upgrade needed. I need to review this game at a later date because he had me convinced!

"I don't live in Kansas, silly"

Ok, that's a fair excuse. However, if you don't have plans to visit that neck of the woods. I encourage you to look to see if there are any tabletop gaming conventions in your area.

Overall, I think most cons try to be inclusive, but KantCon really means it. Not once did I run into anyone who was like "You don't know what that is?" *scoff*. Children and adults alike were on the game floor, having an amazing time. Above all, everyone was super respectful and kind to everyone.

My only complaint? That I didn't purchase this.

What do you guys think? Is this something that would make you want to go to KantCon? Holler at me in the comments section.

The Games We Play

With a baby in the house that needs almost constant attention (she throws a massive fit if we put her in her baby gate and do not join her), I do not get to play video games as much as I used to. I am also her primary caregiver. This is not by choice, If I put her in her father's arms and walk away, a scream that rattles the bones of the dead is emitted out of her. It doesn't happen every time, but enough that she is basically my shadow.

When I do get a chance to play, my game of choice is Guild Wars 2. I play a Sylvari named Andewyn. On my birthday I recieved the expansion Heart of Thorns. I have logged roughly 3-4 hours of game play since recieiving. I love it so much, but my time to play is limited to when Geeky Baby is sleep or out of the house. When she is at daycare, I am at work, so you know how that is.

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Andewyn looking tough

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The night I was acting goofy and made that guy stand next to me because he reminded me of Prince Eric from The Little Mermaid

One of the podcasts I listen to, Hello from the Magic Tavern, keeps advertising this game "Total War: Warhammer." I am dying to play this game. It looks like so much fun. I have never played the Total War series, so any thoughts anyone may have would be great.

I was totally bummed (Anyone on the Facebook page could have told you) that they closed down production of the newest Fable game. Fable is what initally got me into gaming. Before that, I enjoyed watching people play, and basically backseat driving their game, but I never wanted to take the reins.

First there was Fable, then Fallout 3, then Elder Scrolls,  then (oddly enough) Quake and Everquest, Everquest 1999, and Guild Wars. There are other games sprinkled here and there, but these are the major ones. 

I also enjoy watching people stream different games I may not play on Twitch. It gives me the backseat driving on gaming I crave without driving anyone crazy.